Minutes

 

 

 

NORTH CENTRAL REGIONAL ASSOCIATION

 

 

 

STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION DIRECTORS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

181st Meeting

 

 

 

March 25 & 26, 2008

 

 

 

Las Vegas, NV

 

 

 

Devonshire/Aquitaine Room

Call-in phone number: 702-597-7079

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time (PDT)

Agenda Item

Topic 

Presenter

25-Mar

8:00

1.0

Call to Order 

Ken Grafton

 

2.0

Approval of Sept 2007 Minutes (http://www.wisc.edu/ncra/Sept2007.htm)

 

3.0

Adoption of the Agenda 

 

4.0

Executive Committee Report and Interim Actions of the Chair

8:15

5.0

MRC Report 

Doug Buhler

 

 

5.1  New NC-type Projects

 

 

 

5.2 Midterm Reviews

 

 

 

5.3 NRSP Budgets

 

 

 

5.4 Other Funding Decisions

 

 

 

5.5 Other MRC Issues

 

9:45

 

Break

10:00

6.0

Executive Director's Report

Arlen Leholm

10:30

7.0

Best Practices Session - Building Strength Through Collaborations

All

12:00

 

Lunch

1:10

8.0

ESCOP Science and Technology Committee

Steve Pueppke

1:30

9.0

ESCOP Communication/Marketing Committee/System Implementation

Arlen Leholm, Wendy Wintersteen, Bill Ravlin

2:00

10.0

ESCOP Budget and Legislative Committee

Steve Slack, Arlen Leholm, Hunt Shipman (by phone from Cornerstone)

 

 

  10.1  2009 Presidential Budget

 

 

  10.2  Farm Bill Issues

 

 

  10.3  Next Steps

2:30

 

Break

2:45

11.0

Rural Development Center Report

Cornelia Flora (by phone)

3:15

12.0

Great Plains Institute/NCBEC Update

Brendan Jordan (by phone from GPI)

3:45

13.0

1994 Update

Gary Halvorson

4:05

14.0

CSREES Report

Meryl Broussard

4:30

 

EXECUTIVE SESSION 

 

26-Mar

7:00-8:00

 

Breakfast

8:00

15.0

ESCOP Report

Steve Pueppke

8:15

16.0

Nominations Report

Joe Colletti

8:30

17.0

One-Solution Update

Marshall Martin

8:50

18.0

C-FAR Membership Renewal Discussion

Arlen Leholm/Steve Pueppke

9:00

19.0

Resolutions

Ken Grafton

9:10

20.0

Current SAES Budget Situations and State Reports, Part 1

All

9:45

 

Break

10:00

 

Current SAES Budget Situations and State Reports, Part 2

All

11:00

21.0

Future meetings: 

Ken Grafton

 

 

21.1 Planning/location of 2009 NCRA Spring Meeting

 

 

 

21.2 CSREES Admin. Officers Conference: May 3-8, 2008, Savannah, GA

 

 

 

21.3 Mini-Land Grant Meeting: June 22-24, 2008, St. Louis, MO

 

 

 

21.4 Joint COPs Meeting: July 21-24, 2008, The InterContinental, Puerto Rico

Ken Grafton, Arlen Leholm

 

 

 

 

 

21.5  Fall ESS/NCRA Meeting, Traverse City, MI

 

11:20

22.0

Other Items/Announcements

All

11:30

 

Adjourn - Lunch provided


Agenda Briefs

 

Item 5.0: MRC Report

Presenter: Doug Buhler, MRC Chair 2008

 

Item

Proj Type Proj Rvwr

Current Proj # (Temp #)

Title

NCRA AA

MRC Recommendations

NCRA Recommendations

5.1.00

New Projects

 

 

 

 

 

5.1.01

NC

NCDC211 (NC_temp211)

EFNEP Related Research and Outreach

Kirby

This project is a multistate research and extension project on the EFNEP program.  The project has three objectives: a literature review to identify existing valid and reliable methods to measure dietary quality among EPNEP participants; use qualitative, quantitative and biomarker research to test the most promising of these measures for use with EFNEP programs; and to determine which quality of life constructs are affected by EFNEP for participants and paraprofessionals.  The project involves mostly extension personnel with few research scientists.  The major issue with this proposal is a lack of research objectives and the lack of description on how the states will work together on each of the objectives.  The proposal needs to be revised to indicate how to expand the participate of research scientists in collaboration with extension specialists; indicate the interdependence of the project; and expand the dissemination of information outside the land grant system to health care programs, free medical clinics, food pantries, and state and federal social service agencies.  The committee recommends that the project be approved with minor review to include research scientists in the project, the interdependence plan and a plan to expand dissemination the project information to other groups by the midterm review.   Project will become NC1169 pending deferred approval.

Approved

5.1.02

 

NC213 (NC_temp213)

Marketing and Delivery of Quality Cereals and Oilseeds 

Ravlin

Approve with minor revision.  This is a well-written proposal that clearly documents past accomplishments of the members of the committee and presents a solid justification for the continued existence of the committee.  The only significant shortcomings in the proposal are the lack specifics on dissemination of information and technology transfer (including the role of Extension), and specification of common protocols, if the committee has developed them.  In the future the MRC would like to see better documentation of the specific role of NC213 in the generation of the listed accomplishments as well as a more detailed description of the expenditure and impact of the endowment funds.  The resources of the endowment should be used to leverage other funding opportunities from external sources to support collaborative research.  Project will retain its number, NC213.

Approved.

5.1.03

 

NC1005

Landscape Ecology of White-Tailed Deer in Agro-Forest Ecosystems: A Cooperative Approach to Support Management 

Winterstein

Terminating.  No review.

 NA

5.1.04

 

NC1008 (NC_temp168)

Advanced Technologies for the Genetic Improvement of Poultry 

Saif

This is a well written and detailed project proposal that has broad participation from universities, USDA-ARS and industry.  The committee seeks to improve technologies and transfer information to the poultry industry in order to improve production efficiency and performance in response to the dramatic growth of the industry.  The project compliments other poultry related regional projects but does not duplicate their efforts.  Significant progress against each of the project objectives was has been achieved; however, the progress appears to be individual state efforts rather than multi-state efforts.  There has been good participation at the annual meeting.  The renewal builds upon a successful previous project and as such significant progress is reasonably expected from the participants on the renewed project.  Addition of expected milestones would be helpful. Approve with normal revision.  Project will become NC1170.

 Approved

5.1.05

 

NC1011 (NC_temp1011)

Rural Low-Income Families: Tracking their Well-being and Function in an Era of Welfare Reform 

Douthitt

This is large and well established group that has demonstrated good productivity and development over the years of its operation. Productivity of the group has been very good, both in publications and in obtaining extramural funding. One concern is that it is almost impossible to determine which outcomes are the result of the interactions resulting from this project and which would have occurred regardless of participation in this project. The project is well written and clear; evidence for interdependence and the roles of each participating station is well laid out. The outreach plan is clear and concise. The project is recommended for approval without revision.  Project will become NC1171.

 Approved.

5.1.06

 

NC1012

Improved Crop and Livestock Management for Protecting the Non-Glaciated Upper Mississippi Valley

Straub

Terminating, requesting formation of NCDC (see NC_temp215)

 NA

5.1.07

 

NC1013 (NC_temp1013)

The Economic and Psychological Determinatnts of Household Savings Behavior 

Douthitt

The committee has made significant progress over the past three years towards the goal securing funding to conduct a large national survey.  The AA is confident that they are close to accomplishing this goal.  Such a survey would be a significant accomplishment in this area of study.  The focus on a major project is a good example of the multistate system facilitating important research that would not happen otherwise. Action: Approve.  Project will become NC1172.

 Approved

5.1.08

NCCC  

NCCC173 (NC_temp173)

Biochemistry and Genetics of Plant-Fungal Interactions

Kirby

This has been a successful group since its inception in 1991.  What began as a single genus focus has been expanded to include fungal genera with a variety of symbiotic relationships to plants thus broadening the potential for better understanding of fungal-plant relationships.  This group has been successful in advancing knowledge concerning the biochemical and genetic bases of fungal pathogenicity understanding of which has hindered the development of alternative disease control strategies.  The group has established a fungal repository and associated web site.   Meetings have been well attended. Approve/continue with normal revision. Project will become NCCC207.

 Approved

5.1.09

 

NCCC206 (NC_temp206)

Nutrition and Management of Feedlot Cattle to Optimize Performance, Carcass Value and Environmental Compatibility

Reynolds

This group of beef cattle nutritionists has established good relations with stakeholders and provides a valuable service to feedlot cattle operations in the U.S.  The key issue to the sustainability of this industry is providing a quality product at an affordable price relative to the disposable income of consumers.  In an effort to do this, the objectives of this project are focused on the use of co-factors from ethanol production as a substitute for corn in feedlot cattle diets, enhancing the quality of safety of beef through pre-harvest technologies, environmental sustainability and enhancing health and well being of cattle.  In general, these objectives are reflective of the direction in which the industry is moving.

Objectives are very general and could be more specific.  Procedures and activities are heavily weighted towards use of distiller’s coproducts in feeding trials.  It appears that the four objectives may be linked together through the common denominator of all cattle being on a diet containing distiller’s grains but this is difficult to determine from the proposal.  The correlate between the procedures and activities and the objectives could be more specific.  For example, how will environmental sustainability be enhanced through nutritional and management applications?  Interdependence needs to be specified in justification, objectives and procedures for this project.  Other then meeting and sharing ideas there is no description of how the project is interdependent between the involved states.  The project is approved with minor revision necessary to answer the above questions, integrate objective, procedures and outcomes and describe interdependence. Project will become NCCC208 pending deferred approval.

Approved.

5.1.10

NCDC       no review

NCDC212

Metric Definition of the Physical Component of Dairy Diets

Grummer

Terminating, no request submitted and inquires to project and AA went unanswered.

 NA

5.1.11

 

NC_temp215

Cover crops to improve environmental quality in grain and biofuel crop production systems in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi basins.

Straub

The main objective of this NCDC is to bring together a critical mass of Faculty to develop cover crop systems and understand the role that they can play in economic and environmental viability in agriculture. There is not enough critical mass in many universities and so this project is certainly filling an important need. This is an important and timely area of research and fits in well with current research priorities. The group should be encouraged to continue the development of a proposal. Approve.  Project will become NCDC215.

 Approved

5.1.12

 

NC_temp1902

Agricultural Bioethics (was W_temp1902)

Benfield

This project was formerly organized as WERA 1902 and now request to be a new NCDC committee "Agricultural Bioethics" in the North Central Region.  The group proposes to change the title from Animal to Agricultural Bioethics but the proposal still addresses only ethics related to food animal production.  The objectives originate from talks given at the 1998 and 2003 ASAS meetings.  The group proposes adopting a multidisciplinary approach that integrates the expertise of social scientists and philosophers with that of animal scientists to examine the broad issue of bioethical questions pertinent to animal agriculture.  The four proposed objectives encompass a forum for interaction of animal scientists and non-animal scientists on social and ethical issues; encouraging development of teaching, research and extension activities in animal bioethics; developing outreach that facilitates positive interactions between animal scientists and public concerned with animal agriculture; and provide an ongoing critical analysis of the animal science profession in it's ability to address moral and sociopolitical issues.

The formation of this committee is needed and timely.  Animal agriculture is besieged by numerous moral and sociopolitical issues including husbandry practices and other animal welfare and housing practices.  Consumers are driving changes in husbandry practices in the poultry and swine industries that are not founded on sound scientific principles.  The development of resources for use in teaching and outreach activities with students and the public is a needed objective.  However, the proposal neither indicates the interdependence of the 7 states signed on to the project nor which states will take the lead on which objective.  Also rather than develop the teaching modules why not publish through the web a handbook on teaching animal agriculture bioethics and also develop outreach material or a FAQ website to which animal scientists can refer.  Furthermore, the committee should consider inviting representative from animal commodity organizations (pork board, cattleman’s association, poultry association, dairy association etc) and private animal production industries to be part of this committee.  The discussion on bioethics should include this type of public-private interaction as private operations eventually make the changes in husbandry related to bioethics concerns.  It is recommended that the committee be approved as an NCCC with minor revision to develop the interdependence plan and involvement of other outside groups as within the first two years of the project. Project will become NCCC209 pending deferred approval.

Approved.

5.1.13

NCERA  

NCERA194 (NC_temp194)

Improving the management and effectiveness of cooperatively owned business organizations 

Thompson

Both the Administrative Advisor and the NCAC provided strong positive reviews backed by specific accomplishments of the committee.  Based on its review, the MRC concurs and applauds the strong, focused work of the committee. Action: Approve.  Project will become NCERA210.

 Approved

5.1.14

 

NCERA205 (NC_temp205)

Potato Research and Extension Program

Grafton 

This project is requesting a continuation. The project has made good progress during the last three years. A strong and diverse team has been formed and met at regular intervals. Regional resistance of pesticide resistance work was completed. They coordinated trials evaluating forecasting models for late blight and early blight. These have been ongoing for the past three to four years. As a result of this work pest resistance has been improved through the regional screening of Colorado Potato beetle and early blight. New varieties are being planted that have been released through the regional breeding and evaluation programs. Megachip is being produced and sold by at least five seed growers in WI. Regional research efforts are being implemented based on feedback from producer, processor and industry members on the project. A good number of papers have been published. The team has done really good, coordinated regional work and the project should be continued. Action: Approve.  Project will become NCERA211.

 Approved.

 

5.2.00

Midterm Reviews

 

 

 

 

 

5.2.01

NC    

NC205

Ecology and Management of European Corn Borer and Other Lepidopteran Pests of Corn

Pueppke

Approve.  Both the Administrative Advisor and NCAC-1 provided thorough reviews that were very supportive of continuation of this project.  The MRC concurs with this assessment and recommends midterm approval with no reservations.  The MRC views this as a strong and relevant project.

 Approved

 

5.2.02

 

NC1023

Improvement of Thermal and Alternative Processes for Food

Kirby

This is a very productive project and some linkages are evident but this is not well documented in the accomplishment report.  This is something the group can improve upon. A subgroup of four universities received a Higher Education Challenge grant.  The project outline suggests that there has been a significant level of extramural funding from USDA and other competitive programs but I could not find evidence of those awards. Committee members have published numerous scientific papers, a book, developed models and numerous presentations at scientific and professional meetings.  The committee indicates that several member institutions have Extension responsibilities that will deliver information to industry but little evidence is provided about how this has been accomplished to date. Action: Approve with minor revision

 Approved; suggested a split into three smaller groups: 1) Food Safety, 2) Food Shelf-life, and 3) Food Processing.

 

5.2.03

 

NC1024

Domestic Surveillance, Diagnosis, And Therapy Of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies

 

The goal of the project is to form a cooperative of applied and basic researchers focused on animal prion diseases and provide immediate support toward the understanding and control of diseases such as BSE.  The methods outlined incorporate several collaborative efforts among the participating states.  However, no progress report or minutes from recent annual meetings have been submitted so evaluation of past progress is not possible.  Likewise, no information of the group's attempts to secure outside funding was available.  The committee plans to transfer knowledge through publication of scientific papers, development of an ESCOP White Paper on TSE diseases and organization of an International research symposium.  The committee did not, however, address how information transfer through Extension, etc. might occur.  The committee needs to submit a progress report and minutes from annual meetings so that progress to date can be evaluated before approval of the midterm project outline can occur. Decision should be delayed until a progress report and a new midterm review is submitted next year. The committee suggests a one year extension during which time the new AA will work the committee to submit progress reports.  The committee should a new midterm next year.  Assuming the midterm review is positive, the term of the project should be extended by one year.

 Approved a one-year extension, will undergo a new midterm-review in 2009.  Sarah Greening and Ponce De Leon are working on recruiting an AA from MN not directly involved with the project.

5.2.04

 

NC1025

Mycotoxins:Biosecurity and Food Safety

Durgan

Approve.The first goal of this project was to develop data for use in risk assessment of mycotoxins in human and animal health. The groups at Iowa, Indiana, Kansas and Illinois looked at different mycotoxin environments. The next goal was to develop new techniques and improve current assays to identify and measure mycotoxins and mycotoxigenic fungi in cereal grains. North Dakota and Indiana have been developing gene-based methods to detect and quantify mycotoxigenic fungi. The group in Missouri examined new analytical methodology. Kansas tested the efficacy of sorting corn kernels. The third goal was to establish integrated strategies to manage and to prevent mycotoxin contamination in cereal grains. Several states also made significant contributions towards this goal. The last goal was to define the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis and the molecular relationships between mycotoxigenic fungi. Several groups focused on understanding the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis in F. verticilliodes. The project has resulted in a strong record of publications. The progress has been very good. 

 Approved

5.2.05

 

NC1026

Characterize Weed Population Dynamics for Improved Long-Term Weed Management Decision Making

Buhler

The objectives of this project have been to determine the importance of representing demographic realism within weed decision support systems (DSS) and to facilitate incorporating the information that can best help to improve weed management decision making. Over the course of the project WeedSOFT, the world's most popular weed management software, was overhauled to determine the importance of how weeds that survive management treatment affect decisions recommended by the software. The group also tested the software with experimental work. The team worked well together and accomplished most of the objectives of the original project. It was not possible to find the record of published papers. This output needs to be made available before any further funding decisions should be made. Also unreported is the number of additional grants that have resulted from the project. These too need to be reported. All of this information is needed before a funding decision is made. Action taken: Approve/Continue

 Approved

5.2.06

 

NC1131

Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Skeletal Muscle Growth and Differentiation 

Grant

This committee has made excellent progress on all three objectives related to signal transduction, molecular mechanisms of gene expression and cytoskeletal protein and degradation in skeletal muscle. Members of this committee form a unique group of scientists devoted to the study of muscle cell growth and regeneration in food animal.  Although the amount of dollars obtained from extramural funds is not documented in the report, it is obvious that the members of this committee are successful in generating USDA NRI, NSF and NIH funds to support their research.  Members of this committee published 79 refereed papers, 63 published abstracts and 3 book chapters during the two years of the project.  The group also sponsored a symposium at the American Society for Animal Science meeting.  The project is on track and should continue.

 Approved

5.2.07

NCCC  

NCCC52

Family Economics

Achterberg

Very effective committee that has worked well to identify important family economic issues, resulting in two new NC Projects. This committee is functioning very well and is meeting their targeted goals and activities. Approve for continuation.

 Approved

5.2.08

 

NCCC134

Applied Commodity Price Analysis, Forecasting, and Market Risk Management 

Hallam

Linit: In the past three years this committee has held three annual meetings at which 84 presentations were made, 58 of which have been published on the project’s website.  That website contains all papers delivered at the annual meeting s for the 26 year history of the meetings.  A total of 145 individuals participated in annual meeting s over the three year period. This project is a primary source of communication and collaboration for researchers interested in commodity price analysis, forecasting, etc.  The project serves the needs of the official members in addition to any other individuals interested in the discussion and communications of the group.  The project website serves as a national achieve of papers submitted on topics of relevance for the project.

Leholm: NCCC-134 is an excellent committee with a great purpose and great results for research, teaching and extension. It has a long history of productivity.

Action: Approve/continue with normal revision

 Approved

5.2.09

NCERA  

NCERA197

Agricultural Safety and Health Research and Extension

Martin

Very effective NCERA committee, good interaction, excellent ties to the DHHS and the national safety programs for agriculture and other areas. Recommend Approval for continuation.

 Approved

5.2.10

 

NCERA201

Integrated Pest Management 

Wintersteen

Project started late, will be requesting a one year extension, so mid-term review will be due next year.

 Approved

 

5.3.00

NRSP Budgets

 

 

 

 

 

5.3.01

 

NRSP1

Research Planning Using the Current Research Information System (CRIS)

Ravlin

Recommend approval as requested.

 Approved

5.3.02

 

NRSP3

The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)

Buhler

This program sets a framework for cooperation among State Agricultural Experiment Stations, universities, government agencies and non governmental organizations that participate in and support the National Atmospheric deposition Program ( NADP). The NADP provides quality assured data and information on the exposure of managed and natural ecosystems and cultural resources to acidic compounds, nutrients, base cations and mercury in precipitation. Several states have made excellent progress in this program. There is also a good publication record, and funding for this program should be continued.  The budget request seems reasonable. Approve

 Approved

 

5.3.03

 

NRSP4

High Value Specialty Crop Pest Management

Buhler

The project has requested the same budget that was implemented in September 2004 and the same as FY08.  The entire budget request is to fund 3.62 FTEs that administer the NRSP-4 program.  The proposal lists $16.3 million from CSREES, ARS and private industry in leveraged funding that is commendable.  The project advisors have asked for a one-year extension of this project to September 30, 2010.  The justification for this request is to allow for a stakeholder review conference in December 2008 and a CSREES review in early spring 2009 of the project.  These external reviews are an excellent idea and should be allowed to occur and thus the one-year extension should be supported.  However, one questions why the stakeholder meeting is delayed until the last month of 2008 and was not scheduled earlier? Finally, this proposal is top heavy with administrator salaries ($481,182) for an average of 0.6 FTE of 6 positions.  This management structure should be a major object of review by the stakeholders and CSREES  to determine if a better and more efficient management model can be instituted. Approve.

 Approved

5.3.04

 

NRSP5

National Program for Controlling Virus Diseases of Temperate Fruit Tree Crops

Linit

This is a vital program for the continued health of the US fruit industry and is credited with saving the advanced breeding selections and materials from the Michigan State University program following plum pox virus contamination.  The activities of this project should be picked up by industry.  The committee recommends that the project be phased out according to the original plan.

 Approved; Project should phase-out/terminate on original timetable

5.3.05

 

NRSP6

Inter-Regional Potato introduction Project

Jahn

This project needs to continue to move on to extramural support from industry. Recommend returning to the prior model of phasing out this budget and moving to external support. 

 Approved project phase-out

5.3.06

 

NRSP7

A National Agricultural Program for Minor Use Animal Drugs

Baker

Actual report very confusing, letter written by Gary Adams greatly helps clarify project.  Decline support and recommend returning to external sources.

 Approved; decline funding

5.3.07

 

NRSP8

National Animal Genome Research Program

Stromberg

Approve.  This has been a productive and visible project.  The budget request is in line with the proposed activities.

 Approved

5.3.08

 

NRSP_temp101

USDA UV-B Monitoring and Research Program: Enhancement of Network Data Products, Research Support, and National Research Collaboration

Sommers (W)

This is request for a new NRSP project and off the top funding of $300,000 in support of the USDA UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) that has a mission to provide high quality data, data products and services in support of agricultural research related to UV-B.  The request has 4 objectives: Broaden the stakeholder base and increase and enhance collaboration with agricultural researchers and stakeholders; Leverage investment in the existing database by developing custom data products and tools to fulfill identified needs of national agricultural researchers; Provide a web-based interface for stakeholder access to crop yields and climate stresses stimulated by climate-crop models; and Develop hardware and instrumentation for use by agricultural researchers conducting lab, greenhouse and field studies to quantify effects of enhanced or diminished UV-B irradiance.  Associated with the UVMRP is the Center for Remote Sensing and Modeling for Agricultural Sustainability.  There are 14 LGUs that cooperate or collaborate with the UVMRP program.

Overall, the proposal does not making a convincing argument as to why this should be an NRSP project with off-the-top funding.  The objectives could be accomplished through the organization of an NC committee with the 14 states, ARS and UVMRP.  As an example, objective 1 proposes to use funds to increase the stakeholder base through support for workshops, meetings with USDA and other agricultural conferences.  This could be done through a multistate research committee and the members of the UVMRP attending professional and other meetings to make stakeholders aware of their program. Much the same is true for the other three objectives, these could be accomplished through the multistate organization and do not require an NRSP.  Overall, there was no compelling justification as to what advantage and NRSP would offer to stakeholders on the topic of UV-B irradiation.  While research on UV-B is important to agriculture and human health, the program should be competitive for federal and other funding and not need NRSP status.  Therefore, the request for funds was not approved by the NC MRC.

 Approved; justification for national project not sufficient.  Would work fine as a multi-state project.

5.4.00

Other Funding Decisions

 

 

 

 

 

5.4.01

 

NCDC214

Management of Corn Diseases 

Colletti

Requesting a one-year extension of the NCDC.  Obtained letters of support from two SAES Directors as required. Recommend Approval

 Approved

5.5.00

Other MRC Issues

 

 

 

 

 

5.5.01

NC506 termination extended to 12/31/2008.  See below email from Ellen Danus of CSREES.

 

5.5.02

Approve Proposed Appendix E Revisions (see below) – MRC Recommends approval

 Approved

5.5.03

Filling/replacing AA positions - thoughts on increasing success/volunteers: tap into Extension for NCERAs, other ideas

 Approved

5.5.04

Reporting multistate activities: any organized activity tracked to CRIS project a multi-state expense.  Hatch and state $ that match against those dollars are used.  How do other NC states report? Describe how you attribute time and effort to multi-state activities. Are only NC-type projects included in the 25% or do you also report travel for NCERAs/NCDCs/NCCCs?

 

5.5.05

What are the official restrictions on the use of multi-state funds?  Can we fund some NCERA’s or NCCC’s?  Yes, as long as reporting requirements are met and the funding is used in the spirit of the Hatch Fund.

 

5.5.06

Multi-State Research Award nominee from NC region: NC229

 Approved

 


 

2009

Requests for Off-the-Top Funding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Request

Authorized

Request

Authorized

Request

Authorized

Request

 

Project

FY 2006

FY 2006

FY 2007

FY 2007

FY 2008

FY 2008

FY 2009

Action Needed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NRSP-1

306,916

306,916

315,524

315,524

337,574

337,574

346,829

1 yr budget recommendation

NRSP-3

84,000

84,000

72,000

72,000

61,000

61,000

50,000

1 yr budget recommendation

NRSP-4

481,172

481,172

481,182

481,182

481,182

481,182

481,182

1 yr budget recommendation

NRSP-5

146,000

146,000

96,000

96,000

146,000

146,000

145,678

1 yr budget recommendation

NRSP-6

151,900

150,00

110,000

110,000

110,000

150,000

150,000

1 yr budget recommendation

NRSP-7

 

 

0

326,018

542,700

325,000

325,000

1 yr budget recommendation

NRSP-8

400,000

400,000

400,000

400,000

400,000

400,000

400,000

1 yr budget recommendation

NRSP_TEMP101

 

 

 

 

 

 

300,000

1 yr budget recommendation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NRSP-1

Research Planning Using the Current Research Information System (CRIS)

 

 

NRSP-3

The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)

 

 

 

NRSP-4

High Value Specialty Crop Pest Management

 

 

 

 

NRSP-5

National Program for Controlling Virus Diseases of Temperate Fruit Tree Crops

 

NRSP-6

Inter-Regional Potato Introduction Project: Acquisition, classification, preservation, evaluation

 

and distribution of potato (Solanum) germplasm

 

 

 

 

NRSP-7

A National Agricultural Program for Minor Use Animal Drugs

 

 

 

NRSP-8

National Animal Genome Research Program

 

 

 

 

NRSP_TEMP101

USDA UV-B Monitoring and Research Program: Enhancement of Network Data Products,

 

Research Support, and National Research Collaboration

 

 

 

 

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2008 11:44:45 -0400
From: "Danus, Ellen" <EDANUS@CSREES.USDA.GOV>
Subject: FW: Subcontracting Between Land-Grant Universities
To: leholm@cals.wisc.edu
Cc: "Sims, Barry" <bsims@csrees.usda.gov>,
 "Broussard, Meryl C" <MBROUSSARD@CSREES.USDA.GOV>
Thread-topic: Subcontracting Between Land-Grant Universities

 
Dr. Leholm,
 
This is in response to our phone conversation on Thursday, March 13, 2008.  The funds transfer that Barry Sims was referring to in the email below are those transfers that the institutions had requested CSREES perform on their behalf (i.e., after the institutional allocations are determined, CSREES would transfer X amt of those funds to another eligible institution).  When we had the significant increase in Hatch funds for FY 2007, some institutions had requested we transfer a portion of their allocation to another State Agricultural Experiment Station.
 
If you have any more specific questions on the Rapid Response Projects, please email them to Barry or I.  Please note that Barry will be out of the office most of next week as his mother-in-law passed away this weekend.  However, please feel free to email any questions as I know these projects are important to the system.
 
Ellen
 
Ellen Danus
Chief
OEP/Policy, Oversight, and Funds Manangement Branch
Cooperative State
Research, Education, and Extension Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
STOP 2299
1400 Independence Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20250-2299

Telephone: (202) 205-5667
Fax: (202) 401-7752
E-mail: edanus@csrees.usda.gov

 
CSREES' mission is to advance knowledge for agriculture, the environment, human health and well-being, and communities.



From: Sims, Barry
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 4:04 PM
To: leholm@cals.wisc.edu
Cc: Danus, Ellen; Hewitt, Bart
Subject: Subcontracting Between Land-Grant Universities
 
Hi Dr. Leholm,
 
This will confirm our conversation today which I held with you after consulting with Ellen Danus.  Contrary to my earlier statements, land-grant universities may sub-contract with each other; however, they may not transfer funds between universities.  Further, if a Hatch Multistate project terminates during the year, the funds may be transferred for use on another Hatch Multistate project which is in progress at the same time.
 
I apologize for any inconvenience my previous response may have caused you.
 
Sincerely,
 
Barry S. Sims
Barry S. Sims, CPA, CGFM
Staff Accountant
OEP/POFMB/Oversight Section
Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
STOP 2299
1400 Independence Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20250-2299

Telephone: (202) 205-0453
Fax: (202) 690-3002
E-mail:  bsims@csrees.usda.gov


MRC item 5.5.02:

For NCRA Approval: Draft Appendix E - Participant

Proj. No.

Project Title:

 

Station:

Name: (last, first)

If the person is not listed in the dropdown, you need to

 

Is this Person the official station representative to this project?

Objectives:

 

Research Commitments:

Scientific Year

Professional Year

Technical Year

Knowledge Area (KA)

Subject of Investigation (SOI)

Field of Science (FOS)

(Click on the title to access the CIS KA, SOI and FOS codes)

Research CIS Codes:

Extension Commitments:

FTE

 

 

 

 

Knowledge Area (KA)

Subject of Investigation (SOI)

Field of Science (FOS)

(Click on the title to access the CIS KA, SOI and FOS codes)

Extension CIS Codes:


Send Email to Participant? Yes No

 


MRC Item 5.5.05: 2005 CSREES Memo regarding use of Hatch MRF:

 

DATE: September 26, 2005

TO: State Agricultural Experiment Station Directors

FROM: Gary Cunningham,Associate Administrator

SUBJECT: Use of Hatch Multistate Research Funds

 

The Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) delegates to the State Agricultural Experiment Station Directors authority to use Hatch Multistate Research Funds (MRF) for the support of regional Coordinating Committees (CCs), the

Educational Extension and Research Activities (ERAs), and the Development Committees (DCs). It is appropriate to use a limited and reasonable amount of these funds on these committees if the proposals outlining their activities meet the following criteria:

  • Multistate (i.e., results benefiting two or more states)
  • Multidisciplinary/cooperative
  • Peer-reviewed
  • Has clearly defined objectives
  • Each participant listed has direct involvement in the accomplishment of objectives
  • Has identified outcomes and impacts
  • Directly addresses the needs of stakeholders and based on priorities developed from stakeholder input
  • Addresses CSREES goals
  • Documented in CRIS and included in the Plan of Work Report of Accomplishments and Results.

 

CSREES reserves the right to restrict the use of MRF funds on these types of projects if it is demonstrated that an excessive amount of MRF funds are used for this purpose.

 

cc: Executive Directors

 

Action Requested:  Approve MRC Recommendations

 

Action Taken:  MRC recommendations were approved by the NCRA; over the next few weeks, Chris will contact each project that underwent review regarding NCRA comments and revisions.

 

Return to top

 


Item 6.0: Executive Director’s Report

Presenter: Arlen Leholm

 

 

Quick overview of my first year;

·         Leadership transition of NCRA

o       Chris Hamilton hired

·         12 state visits

·         Potential Collaborations and where NCRA may provide added value

o       Energy

o       Help with Dairy Consortium—met with James Drackley

o       Discovery Farms

o       Several trades identified among states

·         Leadership for System Marketing effort

·         Federal Budget and CSREES Efforts

·         Experiment Station Section Excellence in Multistate Research Award

·         Input on Joint meeting in spring of 2009 with NE Region – Discuss a joint meeting with the Extension Directors

·         Input on email protocol – FYI vs. RSVP

·         NCRA Budget for Executive session

·         Sungrant: 2.9 Million DOE grant request for proposals (feedstocks, Bioeconomy)

 

Input on coming years priorities for NCRA

·         Normal functions of NCRA office

·         May 21 Five State Energy Collaboration (IL,IN, IO, MI, WI) – now open to all 12 NC States

·         Help Dairy Consortium

·         National Vegetable Strategic Planning May 12 and 13

·         Ohio and Missouri—Teams at the top

·         Potential synergy with new NCCEA Executive Director

 

Action requested: For information only.

 

 

Item 7.0: Best Practices Session—Building Strength Through Collaborations

Identify priority collaborations for region (Soybeans, cellulosic biomass/trees, biofuels)

·         Identify where NCRA could add value

 

Item 9.0: ESCOP Communication/Marketing Committee/System Implementation

Presenters: Arlen Leholm, Wendy Wintersteen, and Bill Ravlin

 

The System Communication and Marketing Implementation Committee Plan

Why

 Despite the vital work and exciting discoveries at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations (AES) and Cooperative Extension Services (CES), federal funding for their programs has not increased, in real terms, over the past 30 years.  To remedy this situation, the System Communication and Marketing Implementation Committee recommended a marketing (educational) campaign aimed at key federal officials.

 

Who is involved?

In the fall of 2007, the System Communication and Marketing Implementation Committee was formed to provide a coordinated and targeted educational effort to increase awareness of AES and CES.  The System Implementation Committee is made up of two deans from the College of Agriculture, the ECOP and ESCOP Chairs, the ESCOP and ECOP Marketing Committee Chairs, one member each from ACOP and ICOP, and staff from the regional associations and NASULGC. ACOP and ICOP programs are also included in this effort.

 

Strategy

How do we build upon existing efforts to get better recognition of AES and CES and turn that into strategic support for our programs? The System Communication and Marketing Implementation Committee believes that earlier and repeated use of the media to educate and attract major congressional sponsors for our programs is the best way to go forward. We have to build support in home districts and states of our congressional champions and convert that locally-based support into explanations of and publicity for the national AES and CES system.

 

The System Communication and Marketing Implementation Committee has identified 13 members of the House and 15 members of the Senate (the members of the House and Senate Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittees) that will be the focus of this educational campaign. Marketing efforts will strategically target the right issue with the right appropriation champion.

Cornerstone and the Podesta Group

The Podesta Group has been hired to launch the educational campaign.  Cornerstone will coordinate closely with the Podesta Group in this effort.  Cornerstone is our advocacy firm and Podesta is the marketing/public relations firm. There is no duplication of effort between Podesta and Cornerstone.

 

Budget

The Experiment Station Section has approved a three year annual assessment at the $300,000 level for this effort which will become available on July 1, 2008 and, an additional $75,000 is available immediately. ECOP on March 13, 2008 passed the following motion: “ECOP recommends that the Cooperative Extension Section utilize $100,000 per year from its $200,000 Marketing Assessment for up to 3 years, with the annual renewal subject to a performance review, in support of the System Marketing and Communications proposal. No new CES assessment is required to fund this action.  Final approval is subject to a vote of the Cooperative Extension Section.  An electronic vote will take place 30 days following a formal announcement of the vote.” This investment is based on the condition that the overall contract with Podesta and Cornerstone for the System Marketing Plan not exceed $300,000 per year. 

 

No more than $240,000 will be available for this effort during the first 12 months of the campaign for the Podesta Group and $60,000 will be available for Cornerstone’s coordination efforts. A formal contract will be completed soon with the Podesta Group and Cornerstone.

 

Action Requested: None, for information only

 

 

Return to top

 

 

Item 10: ESCOP Budget and Legislative Committee Report

Presenters: Steve Slack, Arlen Leholm, Hunt Shipman (by phone from Cornerstone)

 

Oppose the Proposed Land-Grant Research Cuts

 

The President's FY 2009 budget proposes to cut or eliminate funding for three research programs at the USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service. These three programs support agriculture, forestry, and animal health/disease research at America's land-grant universities and related institutions. NASULGC makes the following estimates of the financial and employment losses which could occur under the proposal.

Congress must reject these proposed reductions.

SUMMARY INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

Federal

State

Faculty/Staff

State

Institution

$ Reduction

$ Reduction

Reductions

Alabama

Auburn University

1,481,577

2,434,549

93

Alaska

University of Alaska

416,188

416,188

6

American Samoa

American Samoa Community College

218,850

0

25

Arizona

University of Arizona

709,356

0

8

Arkansas

University of Arkansas

1,267,320

4,236,823

57

California

University of California

2,287,305

0

0

Colorado

Colorado State University

1,213,601

1,200,000

31

Connecticut

Connecticut AES (New Haven)

258,548

0

12

Connecticut

University of Connecticut

329,573

329,573

0

Delaware

University of Delaware

423,426

0

0

Florida

University of Florida

1,164,343

8,000,000

19

Georgia

University of Georgia

1,736,114

0

38

Guam

University of Guam

267,399

0

3

Hawaii

University of Hawaii

426,180

800,000

40

Idaho

University of Idaho

829,092

4,522,750

58

Illinois

University of Illinois

1,785,091

800,000

65

Indiana

Purdue University

1,655,061

1,655,061

126

Iowa

Iowa State University

2,124,339

3,600,000

58

Kansas

Kansas State University

1,241,901

1,241,901

60

Kentucky

University of Kentucky

1,699,210

1,699,210

99

Louisiana

Louisiana State University

1,090,116

3,497,840

129

Maine

University of Maine

750,290

0

20

Maryland

University of Maryland

813,478

2,033,695

38

Massachusetts

University of Massachusetts

710,740

0

16

Michigan

Michigan State University

1,700,579

3,500,000

20

Micronesia

College of Micronesia

228,240

100,000

7

Minnesota

University of Minnesota

1,809,082

1,809,082

55

Mississippi

Mississippi State University

1,361,094

0

24

Missouri

University of Missouri

1,756,085

1,756,000

41

Montana

Montana State University

732,305

4,000,000

30

Nebraska

University of Nebraska

1,245,114

1,245,114

12

Nevada

University of Nevada

411,573

411,573

8

New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire

533,462

1,536,370

15

New Jersey

Rutgers University

807,255

6,109,485

82

New Mexico

New Mexico State University

607,016

0

8

New York

Cornell University (and Geneva AES)

1,811,015

0

25

North Carolina

North Carolina State University

2,226,290

0

46

North Dakota

North Dakota State University

763,484

763,484

20

Northern Marianas

Northern Marianas College

206,580

0

10

Ohio

Ohio State University

1,967,557

2,000,000

55

Oklahoma

Oklahoma State University

1,216,778

1,212,778

30

Oregon

Oregon State University

1,164,576

1,164,575

9

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania State University

1,954,833

0

35

Puerto Rico

University of Puerto Rico

942,243

0

42

Rhode Island

University of Rhode Island

381,955

0

5

South Carolina

Clemson University

1,166,848

2,840,408

44

South Dakota

South Dakota State University

854,287

854,287

40

Tennessee

University of Tennessee

1,611,980

0

19

Texas

Texas A&M University

2,549,884

0

46

Utah

Utah State University

644,328

70,000

19

Vermont

University of Vermont

519,706

2,400,000

35

Virgin Islands

University of the Virgin Islands

262,564

125,771

8

Virginia

Virginia Tech

1,440,150

9,794,252

156

Washington

Washington State University

1,224,946

946,493

36

West Virginia

West Virginia University

875,336

0

33

Wisconsin

University of Wisconsin

1,759,660

4,000,000

50

Wyoming

University of Wyoming

547,133

0

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated Totals

62,640,472

83,107,262

2,079

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HATCH  ACT (AG RESEARCH) REDUCTIONS

 

 

 

 

 

FY 2008

FY 2009

 

State

Institution

Estimate

President

Reduction

Alabama

Auburn University

4,098,761

2,891,140

1,207,621

Alaska

University of Alaska

1,016,718

717,162

299,556

American Samoa

American Samoa Community College

728,077

513,563

214,514

Arizona

University of Arizona

2,084,822

1,470,569

614,253

Arkansas

University of Arkansas

3,442,904

2,428,518

1,014,386

California

University of California

5,527,380

3,898,843

1,628,537

Colorado

Colorado State University

2,870,590

2,024,825

845,765

Connecticut

Connecticut AES (New Haven)

764,369

539,162

225,207

Connecticut

University of Connecticut

1,011,714

713,632

298,082

Delaware

University of Delaware

1,315,236

927,727

387,509

District of Columbia

University of the District of Columbia

739,466

521,596

217,870

Florida

University of Florida

3,216,150

2,268,573

947,577

Georgia

University of Georgia

4,841,394

3,414,970

1,426,424

Guam

University of Guam

881,507

621,788

259,719

Hawaii

University of Hawaii

1,312,531

925,819

386,712

Idaho

University of Idaho

2,247,520

1,585,331

662,189

Illinois

University of Illinois

5,469,342

3,857,905

1,611,437

Indiana

Purdue University

5,127,921

3,617,077

1,510,844

Iowa

Iowa State University

6,028,985

4,252,660

1,776,325

Kansas

Kansas State University

3,571,748

2,519,401

1,052,347

Kentucky

University of Kentucky

5,153,876

3,635,385

1,518,491

Louisiana

Louisiana State University

3,110,602

2,194,123

916,479

Maine

University of Maine

1,962,084

1,383,994

578,090

Maryland

University of Maryland

2,471,574

1,743,372

728,202

Massachusetts

University of Massachusetts

2,128,182

1,501,154

627,028

Michigan

Michigan State University

5,251,425

3,704,193

1,547,232

Micronesia

College of Micronesia

774,665

546,425

228,240

Minnesota

University of Minnesota

5,174,072

3,649,631

1,524,441

Mississippi

Mississippi State University

3,878,145

2,735,524

1,142,621

Missouri

University of Missouri

5,037,939

3,553,607

1,484,332

Montana

Montana State University

2,282,422

1,609,950

672,472

Nebraska

University of Nebraska

3,510,346

2,476,090

1,034,256

Nevada

University of Nevada

1,267,203

893,846

373,357

New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire

1,523,358

1,074,530

448,828

New Jersey

Rutgers University

2,550,907

1,799,331

751,576

New Mexico

New Mexico State University

1,703,664

1,201,712

501,952

New York

Cornell University

4,633,227

3,268,135

1,365,092

New York

New York AES (Geneva)

813,103

573,537

239,566

North Carolina

North Carolina State University

6,331,911

4,466,334

1,865,577

North Dakota

North Dakota State University

2,389,698

1,685,619

704,079

Northern Marianas

Northern Marianas College

701,148

494,568

206,580

Ohio

Ohio State University

6,174,121

4,355,034

1,819,087

Oklahoma

Oklahoma State University

3,360,379

2,370,307

990,072

Oregon

Oregon State University

3,148,412

2,220,792

927,620

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania State University

6,051,683

4,268,671

1,783,012

Puerto Rico

University of Puerto Rico

3,093,496

2,182,057

911,439

Rhode Island

University of Rhode Island

1,238,408

873,534

364,874

South Carolina

Clemson University

3,424,752

2,415,714

1,009,038

South Dakota

South Dakota State University

2,572,127

1,814,299

757,828

Tennessee

University of Tennessee

4,859,685

3,427,872

1,431,813

Texas

Texas A&M University

7,256,014

5,118,168

2,137,846

Utah

Utah State University

1,874,096

1,321,929

552,167

Vermont

University of Vermont

1,504,012

1,060,884

443,128

Virgin Islands

University of the Virgin Islands

853,754

602,212

251,542

Virginia

Virginia Tech

4,199,660

2,962,310

1,237,350

Washington

Washington State University

3,478,338

2,453,512

1,024,826

West Virginia

West Virginia University

2,596,140

1,831,237

764,903

Wisconsin

University of Wisconsin

5,210,787

3,675,528

1,535,259

Wyoming

University of Wyoming

1,625,902

1,146,861

479,041

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated Totals

181,468,452

128,002,242

53,466,210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCINTIRE-STENNIS COOPERATIVE FORESTRY REDUCTIONS

 

 

 

 

FY 2008

FY 2009

 

State

Institution

Estimate

President

Reduction

Alabama

Auburn University

829,082

650,899

178,183

Alaska

University of Alaska

532,170

417,798

114,372

American Samoa

American Samoa Community College

20,176

15,840

4,336

Arizona

Northern Arizona University

220,093

172,791

47,302

Arizona

University of Arizona

220,092

172,791

47,301

Arkansas

University of Arkansas

689,080

540,985

148,095

California

California Polytechnic State University 

110,362

86,644

23,718

California

California State University, Humboldt

110,362

86,644

23,718

California

University of California

515,022

404,335

110,687

Colorado

Colorado State University

377,961

296,731

81,230

Connecticut

Connecticut AES

155,135

121,794

33,341

Connecticut

University of Connecticut

51,712

40,598

11,114

Delaware

University of Delaware

82,399

64,690

17,709

Florida

University of Florida

642,411

504,346

138,065

Georgia

University of Georgia

844,640

663,112

181,528

Guam

University of Guam

35,732

28,052

7,680

Hawaii

University of Hawaii

160,178

125,753

34,425

Idaho

University of Idaho

486,853

382,220

104,633

Illinois

Southern Illinois University

173,425

136,153

37,272

Illinois

University of Illinois

173,425

136,153

37,272

Indiana

Purdue University

393,517

308,943

84,574

Iowa

Iowa State University

300,181

235,667

64,514

Kansas

Kansas State University

222,403

174,605

47,798

Kentucky

University of Kentucky

502,409

394,433

107,976

Louisiana

Louisiana State University 

493,245

387,238

106,007

Louisiana

Louisiana Tech University

211,390

165,959

45,431

Maine

University of Maine

657,967

516,559

141,408

Maryland

University of Maryland 

253,513

199,029

54,484

Massachusetts

University of Massachusetts

269,069

211,242

57,827

Michigan

Michigan State University

240,063

188,470

51,593

Michigan

Michigan Technological University

240,063

188,470

51,593

Michigan

University of Michigan

240,064

188,470

51,594

Minnesota

University of Minnesota

564,632

443,283

121,349

Mississippi

Mississippi State University

797,971

626,473

171,498

Missouri

University of Missouri

517,964

406,645

111,319

Montana

University of Montana

455,740

357,794

97,946

Nebraska

University of Nebraska

253,513

199,029

54,484

Nevada

University of Nevada

129,067

101,328

27,739

New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire

362,405

284,518

77,887

New Jersey

Rutgers State University

191,290

150,179

41,111

New Mexico

New Mexico State University

331,293

260,093

71,200

New York

Cornell University

164,492

129,140

35,352

New York

State University of New York

493,475

387,419

106,056

North Carolina

North Carolina State University

813,526

638,686

174,840

North Dakota

North Dakota State University

113,510

89,115

24,395

Ohio

Ohio State University

409,073

321,156

87,917

Oklahoma

Oklahoma State University

424,628

333,369

91,259

Oregon

Oregon State University

782,415

614,261

168,154

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania State University

549,077

431,071

118,006

Puerto Rico

University of Puerto Rico

97,955

76,902

21,053

Rhode Island

University of Rhode Island

66,843

52,477

14,366

South Carolina

Clemson University

626,856

492,134

134,722

South Dakota

South Dakota State University

144,623

113,541

31,082

Tennessee

University of Tennessee

611,300

479,921

131,379

Texas

Stephen F. Austin State University

375,651

294,918

80,733

Texas

Texas A&M University

375,651

294,918

80,733

Utah

Utah State University

284,626

223,455

61,171

Vermont

University of Vermont

315,737

247,880

67,857

Virgin Islands

College of the Virgin Islands

51,287

40,265

11,022

Virginia

Virginia Tech

673,522

528,771

144,751

Washington

Washington State University

345,086

270,921

74,165

Washington

University of Washington

421,773

331,127

90,646

West Virginia

West Virginia University

471,296

370,006

101,290

Wisconsin

University of Wisconsin

580,189

455,496

124,693

Wyoming

University of Wyoming

175,735

137,966

37,769

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated Totals

23,426,395

18,391,671

5,034,724

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANIMAL HEALTH & DISEASE RESEARCH REDUCTIONS

 

 

 

 

 

FY 2008

FY 2009

 

State

Institution

Estimate

President

Reduction

Alabama

Auburn University (AES)

45,461

0

45,461

Alabama

Auburn University (VM)

50,312

0

50,312

Alabama

Tuskegee University (VM)

9,045

0

9,045

Alaska

University of Alaska (AES)

2,260

0

2,260

Arizona

University of Arizona (AES)

47,802

0

47,802

Arkansas

University of Arkansas (AES)

104,839

0

104,839

California

University of California-Oakland (AES)

140,876

0

140,876

California

University of California-Davis (VM)

407,205

0

407,205

Colorado

Colorado State University (AES, VM)

286,606

0

286,606

Connecticut

University of Connecticut (AES)

20,377

0

20,377

Delaware

University of Delaware (AES

18,208

0

18,208

Florida

University of Florida (AES)

60,296

0

60,296